Enjoy the day-to-day adventures of an Occupational Therapist in training!

Posts tagged ‘comfort’

Please tell me that was dirt: A tale about optimism

Everybody and their sister has heard the classic optimism vs pessimism example of the glass being half full or half empty. Last night, while cleaning Lou’s feet, I came up with a “horse themed” optimism vs. pessimism anecdote that goes like this: Was that dirt or poop? Let me tell y’all the traumatic incident that led to my revelation. So like I said, I was picking Lou’s feet and this idiot (me) left her mouth open while crud was flying around my face from Lou’s feet… I’m sure you can guess what happened next- a nice chunk of dirt, horse poop, or both flew into my mouth. I would love to say that I handled the situation with grace, but grace isn’t very funny now is it? Now that the back story has been established, allow me to elaborate on my anecdote! Having either dirt or horse poo in your mouth is disgusting- but which would be worse to accidentally ingest?  My vote is poop, but to each his own! Even though dirt tastes awful, it could have been so much worse!  So when you’re face with a situation where both outcomes are crappy, try to stay optimistic and pick the lesser of two nasty’s to focus on!

Another life lesson  that can be  gathered from this experience, other than the obvious “don’t pick a horse’s feet with your mouth open”, is to never get too comfortable. I have picked Lou’s feet every Monday and Thursday for the last month, and just as I was getting used to doing it, this happened! Last night at DR I was feeling really confident and comfortable when I got there-finally, all of the “chores” on the board looked familiar to me and I was able to do them all without needing clarification. When the riders got there, I found out that I was not going to be side walking with Zach, but rather a rider who usually comes on Thursday and was making up a lesson yesterday. Just when I thought I was good to go, I got thrown for a loop! I had to adapt myself to the new rider, James, a 4 year old boy with Down Syndrome. James has no verbal skills and is working on his fine motor skills, like lifting a plastic diving ring off a hook and placing it onto another pole. This is the opposite of what I’m used to on Mondays. Zach needs help with his vocal skills and very little help with his motor skills. I’m not going to lie, I would glance over and check on Zach every now and them, just to make sure that he was doing okay! Changing riders was helpful because I am still learning how to adapt to different patients. James is the first child with Down Syndrome that I have ever worked with, and I had to be more energetic than usual in order to keep his attention!  I have to be able to call on different skills at different times and be able to think on my feet when I have never worked with someone who has a particular disorder before!

Last night I got some really great feedback from Miss Corky, the assistant riding instructor,  told me that I was a really easy going volunteer and that she liked working with me! That comment made me feel great because I work hard to represent myself and Columbia College well. I also love the work that I do for them, so it was nice to see that she thinks that I’m doing a good job! I’m not gonna let this get to my head… who knows what could happen Thursday, but I can promise you that I’m not going to open my mouth while I’m taking care of Lou-just in case!

 

 

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