Enjoy the day-to-day adventures of an Occupational Therapist in training!

Posts tagged ‘funny’

How many interns does it take to change a light bulb?

If you answered “Just one” then you’re absolutely right… just because I’m the only intern at Dream Riders! Today. we had so many volunteers, which is a GREAT problem to have! I suppose that today was a “slow” day for me.  Instead of doing my normal job of side walking, I worked on other tasks like changing a light bulb!

Funny story: the assistant riding instructor, Ms. Corky, calls me Katie… all the time… and for those of you who don’t know, my name is Sami-not Katie. So this evening, Ms. Corky calls me over and says, “Hey Katie, how tall are you?” So I answered 5’10 and then she proceeded to tell me that I’m definitely tall enough to change a light bulb. Kind of an odd way to ask someone for help, but then again, Ms. Corky isn’t the most conventional person I’ve ever met! So I changed a light bulb (while the circuit was still active mind, you… I had to be able to see what I was doing-apparently) Yolo.

I really am loving the “barn mentality.” Essentially, if you can help, you’re going to. It doesn’t really matter what the task is, and it (in my case) is usually something that you’ve never really done before. This calls for one to be independent and a great problem solver! Usually, by the time you can formulate a question, the person telling you what to do is already on to something else so you’ve got to figure it out the best way you can! This isn’t to say that the DR staff (of 2 people) aren’t willing to help, they are just really busy ladies! I feel like barn life is simplistic, in a good way, of course. It’s easy to over think things, but usually, common sense wins out on how one approaches situations at the barn! Using your noggin is a great skill to have out there in the real world, however rare it might be 😉

I also got to play nurse to a 1000 pound patient again tonight. It’s become my routine every Monday and Thursday to look after Lou, the injured therapy horse. He and I have been together since my first day at DR, and I have to say that he’s been wonderfully patient with me while I struggle to pry information about how to properly put on a halter from deep within my brain. He and I have wonderful chats, I do most of the talking, while I brush him down and make him look sparkly clean. Don’t trust a person who doesn’t talk to his/her horse. I’m taking a course about patient provider interactions and while I am soaking his swollen tendon with icy cold water and rubbing ointment on the affected area, I talk to him like I would talk to a patient receiving OT from me. It’s good practice for me, and I don’t think he seems to mind either. That might sound strange… actually, that does sound strange…but think about it, I’m sure I’ll have patients who cannot verbally respond to me, so I’ll have to read their body language and other nonverbal cues that they give me. Obviously Lou can’t talk, he’s pretty awesome, but he’s no Mr. Ed so I have to rely on his body language to tell me when he is irritated or in pain. Also, horses are incredibly good at reading people’s body language; in other words, they feed on and react to people’s body language. When I feel frustrated that I didn’t put the halter on right for the 1846th time, Lou can sense my frustration and in turn, he becomes irritable as well. I’ve learned to become aware of my emotions, and to get them under control so that the horse (or the rider) doesn’t sense that something is wrong. Both skills are going to be useful for me as an OT, I just never thought that I would learn them and practice them on a horse farm. Did I mention that I am so in love with this “job?”

Well, friends, that’s all I’ve got for tonight! As always, thanks for reading 🙂

Hours at barn:

Monday 2/17/14    1:45pm-7pm

Thursday 2/20/14   4:45-7pm

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